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Wallabies players caught in COVID-19 outbreak | Barbarians match cancelled


A fourth Wallabies players and a staff member are reportedly in isolation after testing positive to COVID-19 in the United Kingdom.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, the five Australians have been caught up in the outbreak which forced the cancellation of the Barbarians match against Samoa, which was to have been played at Twickenham on Saturday.

The Barbarians match was called off just 90 minutes before the scheduled start, with the invitational side’s Twitter account confirming that the match was cancelled on medical grounds.

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“Despite the recent positive COVID tests, we had a fit 23 today who all tested negative this morning. They were ready and keen to take to the pitch against Samoa,” it said.

“The whole squad complied to the letter with the Covid protocols throughout the week, including daily lateral flow tests.

“After today’s results, we worked hard with the RFU, Public Health England and the Testing Oversight Committee, to find a way that we could play. Unfortunately, it was concluded on medical grounds that there was a risk to players on both sides should the game go ahead.

“All of our players are absolutely devastated they were unable to play today in front of an amazing and passionate crowd.”

The cancellation was a huge blow to Samoa, in what would have been their only match of the northern hemisphere autumn.

Players and staff still took to Twickenham to perform the national anthem in a near-empty stadium, followed by their war dance, the Siva Tau, with some players reportedly in tears.

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